Tag Archives: barn

Capturing the Total Impact of a Subject

Old Barn with Wooden Fence - ©Gary Hamburgh 2009 - All Rights Reserved

I have been reviewing and analyzing some of my ideas for effective composition. I remembered an acronym that was shared with me many years ago by my mentor Scott Bourne. The acronym is EDFAT which stands for entire, detail, focal length, angle  and time. EDFAT represents what should be covered when photographing an event or a subject.

1.  Capture the entire scene to give context

2.  Capture details that are important to help tell the story

3.  Change the focal length to add interest

4.  Vary the angle to show different perspectives

5.  Shoot at a different time to capture a different look

The images in this post represent each of the components of the acronym except for time.

Corvair with Red Barn - ©Gary Hamburgh 2009 - All Rights Reserved

I found this old barn in the Palouse and proceeded to capture images that would show the areas of interest in the scene.

Windows on Old Barn - ©Gary Hamburgh 2009 - All Rights Reserved

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barn Window - ©Gary Hamburgh 2009 - All Rights Reserved

Old Door - ©Gary Hamburgh 2009 - All Rights Reserved

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hardware on Barn Door - ©Gary Hamburgh 2009 - All Rights Reserved

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Remember this acronym as you are interacting with a subject or composition so different elements can be shown.

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Workshop in the Palouse

Morning Light on Rolling Hills - ©Gary Hamburgh 2010 - All Rights Reserved

Please join me The Palouse Guy for a workshop in the Palouse. I will be teaching a workshop with Ara Roselani this spring from May 25 – May 29. Go to the workshop tab at the top of page for more details and a registration form.

I hope to see you as we explore and photograph this amazing area with great landscapes and barns.

Vary the Orientation in Your Images

Clouds over Red Barn 1

As I am sitting in rainy Seattle, I am daydreaming about some of my special sites for photography. Admittedly,  a cloudy sky with an old red barn and abundant wheat crop is one of my favorite views. I can think of no better place for that experience than the Palouse region of eastern Washington.

When you find a scene that you particularly relish,  I would encourage you to shoot it from all angles. In addition I always make a composition in both a landscape and a portrait format. I think each of these can tell a different story or give a more complete story about the scene if both are included. I know this is a simple tip but one that I think will enhance your ability to portray the scene that provided meaning for you.

Clouds over Red Barn 2

Enjoy your time as you visit the Palouse and take in all the beautiful scenery of this photo rich area.

Isolate Your Subject for Impact

Old Barn in Wheat Field - ©Gary Hamburgh 2010 - All Rights Reserved

One of my favorite things about photographing in the Palouse is the wide expansive vistas that are available. It makes it very easy to isolate a subject without a lot of wires and clutter around.

The barn in this image was taken in the afternoon and was very easy to shoot from any angle because of the great openness surrounding it. As many times occurs in the Palouse, clouds come up in the afternoon which add to the image. This ability to isolate the subject creates a striking image with simplicity.

To experience this simple beauty, I would suggest a trip to the Palouse area of eastern Washington. Harvest is just starting to get into full swing in the next couple of weeks so the images should be amazing.

Mild Winter in the Palouse

Glowing Fence Posts - Copyright Gary Hamburgh 2010 - All Rights Reserved

As I visited the Palouse today, I was surprised at the look of winter in the area. Typically at this time of year there is snow on the ground and the temperatures are very cold. As you can see from the image at the top of this post there was no snow and the temperature was very moderate.

The winter wheat is showing through the ground and as I spoke with a couple of farmers in the area they mentioned it almost seems like spring has come. Also I was able to drive to the top of Steptoe Butte in my car. I haven’t been able to do that for several years during January.

With the mild weather and some clouds in the sky, I had a great time visiting and photographing the area. Once again, it seems the Palouse is a great region to photograph at any time of the year.

In a Rut?

Deserted Barn - Copyright Gary Hamburgh 2009 - All Rights Reserved

I was sent an article a couple of days ago by a friend and I thought I would share it with you. It is entitled “Choose Your Rut Carefully” and it was written by Lori Woodward Simons. The article deals with how an artist gains a following and becomes known for a particular style or subject.

I have been enjoying photographing in the Palouse for the last few years and that subject has been something I have been known for. As I read the article it made me think about that subject matter and how it fits into my overall work of photography.

I think as you read the article, it will make you do some thinking about your style and how you want to be known. Being in a “rut” can be good or bad depending on your interest and goals.

Be Excited about Your Photography

Cold Day in January - Copyright Gary Hamburgh 2010 - All Rights Reserved

As we start the new year of 2010, we all tend to make resolutions. My mentor Scott Bourne wrote a short article that I think gives us food for thought as photographers. It is entitled “Are You Excited about Photography?”

I think the message is very appropriate as we shoot any subject at any time. I know I have a feeling of joy and excitement as I create images and always am hopeful that I can share my experience through the finished product.
As you are looking for resolutions as you start this new year, incorporate the ideas that are presented to help you create the best images you can to share with others. As I travel the Palouse and others venues, I am constantly aware how fortunate I am to visit these wonderful places and the opportunity I have to capture the moment and share it with others.
Have a Happy New Year!