Tag Archives: harvest

Choose your Combine by Color

John Deere Combine 1 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

John Deere Combine 1 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

When shooting harvest in the Palouse not only are you treated to some beautiful landscape, but the various colors of the farm equipment adds to your images.

John Deere Combine 2 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

John Deere Combine 2 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

John Deere combine 3 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

John Deere combine 3 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

In this post I am going to mainly just share images with you that were taken during the wheat harvest last week in the Palouse. The harvests showing the John Deere and Case combines were shot near Steptoe Butte. Each of the growers that was using these two brands was harvesting between 8500 and 10,000 acres. These are large operations and involve several combines and trucks at each location.

Case IH Combine 3 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Case IH Combine 3 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Case IH Combine by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Case IH Combine by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Case IH Combine 1 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Case IH Combine 1 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

The harvest showing the Gleaner equipment was shot near Dayton, WA. They were harvesting only 4500 acres and using two combines. In this process a tractor pulls a wagon up to the high country where the grain is emptied then the tractor pulls the wagon down to where it is loaded in a truck.

Gleaner Combine 2 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Gleaner Combine 2 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Gleaner Combine 1 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Gleaner Combine 1 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Gleaner Combine 3 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Gleaner Combine 3 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

The dog in the last picture belongs to the man driving the combine. He runs with the combine all day, every day during the harvest.

Try to get to the Palouse to photograph the harvest. It is a colorful scene and very interesting to observe. Hopefully the images in this post let you experience some of the process and scenery that is involved during the wheat harvest.

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Protecting Your Gear in Dusty Conditions

Combine Kicks up Dust by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Combine Kicks up Dust by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

I recently spent the last week shooting wheat harvest in the Palouse area near Colfax, WA. It was a great experience and the scenery was terrific. I quickly became very much aware that I needed to protect my camera gear from the dust that is kicked up by the combines.

The best way to protect your gear in these dusty conditions is with the rain covers you use when you shoot in the rain. They will also protect and keep dust off your gear. I have rarely been in conditions with the extreme dust and chaff that is surrounding you continually. Another word of caution, don’t get directly behind the combine as they are spewing out excessive amounts of dust and chaff whenever they are cutting. In addition to protecting your gear wear something to cover yourself as well because you will be extracting dirt and straw from your person for quite a while if you don’t.

Dust and Chaff in the Air by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Dust and Chaff in the Air by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

In the images that are displayed in this post hopefully you get the idea of the dust and debris that is present. Have a great time shooting the harvest but be prepared so you and your gear can have a more enjoyable time.

Lentil Harvest in the Palouse

Lentil Harvest in the Palouse by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Lentil Harvest in the Palouse by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Harvest has finally begun in the Palouse. Everything is several weeks later than normal but a visit now will allow you to see the harvest in full swing. Farmers work long hours each day to get the fields cut and the seeds into storage. In addition to the cereal crops of wheat and barley, lentils are also grown and harvested in the Palouse region.

Patterns of Rows by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Patterns of Rows by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Palouse farmers generally harvest lentils by mowing and swathing, or they may combine the crop. Swathing is often necessary to kill green weeds and allow them to dry so the lentils can be threshed efficiently. Plants are usually swathed when the pods turn a cream to golden color; then older pods will be dry and their seeds firm.

Lentil Patterns by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Lentil Patterns by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

The images in this blog were all taken from Steptoe Butte in eastern Washington. This high vantage point gives an almost aerial view so the many patterns and contours of the land and crops can be appreciated. Lentil harvest provides beautiful colors and patterns to enrich the landscape in this picturesque region. Visit this region and come away with some truly unique and colorful images of the harvest.

Use lines and patterns to move through an image

Patterns in the Hay by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Patterns in the Hay by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

As you are composing your images look for elements to use as leading lines. in the image above I used the patterns in the hay to draw attention to the barns and lead you through the image.

In the second image the grass leads to the ramp and up to the door.  It invites you to enter the barn as well as enter the image and explore.

Entrance to Old Barn by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Entrance to Old Barn by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

In the final image below the diagonal line of the grass leads your eye to the barn and on throughout the image. The road also adds to leading you through the image by taking you to the stop sign in the distance.

Red Barn near Dirt Road by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Red Barn near Dirt Road by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

These are just a few examples of using elements as you compose to add interest and provide an entry point and a way for your eye to move through the image.


Show Your Work

Red Combine at Work by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Red Combine at Work by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

As I have worked over the last few years with my mentor Scott Bourne, he reminds me of three things that will help you to become more successful. They are the following:

1. Show your work

2. Show your work

3. Show your work

He says this to provide emphasis of how important it is to show your work. Getting your work in  front of people is so critical to your success in selling. Remember that no one will probably show up at your front door looking to buy your work.

Find any avenue that you can to show your work. I will be showing my work at Walla Walla University in an exhibition for alumni weekend in a couple of days. I taught at the university for thirty four years so many of my former students and colleagues will come by to see my work. It will  provide a good opportunity to display  my work as well as let people know about the business that I am now involved in.

Below are some of the pieces of artwork that will be displayed during the exhibition. They will all be large gallery wrapped canvases.

Chocolate and Caramel Mounds by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Chocolate and Caramel Mounds by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Fading Light by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Fading Light by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Wheels in the Wheat by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Wheels in the Wheat by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Evening Light in the Palouse by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Evening Light in the Palouse by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Winn Road Barn in Snow by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Winn Road Barn in Snow by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Remember look for any opportunity you can to follow the advice of “Show your work”.

Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS Review

ef100-400_45-56lisu_586x2251

EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS

I have owned this lens for over two years and it has been a real workhorse for me because of its versatility. This is not the sharpest, fastest or most convenient lens that I own but when I combine what it gives me shot after shot it is indispensable to me. I will discuss some of the things I don’t like about the lens and then talk about its positives.

The push pull zoom is something I still don’t care for. It takes both hands to manipulate it if it is in a locked position. Fortunately I haven’t had any of the dust problems that some people have talked about because of this design, but I find it to be inconvenient. Also the lens for me seems a bit slow on the auto-focus. This has become very evident to me when I am trying to lock on a bird in flight.

Now to the reasons why it has become my favorite walk-around lens. The tremendous versatility it provides because of its zoom range is valuable to me. I find that I use this lens for shooting landscapes as well as wildlife. I may have the lens mounted on a tripod capturing an image of the patterns and textures of the terrain when I notice a bird come into my vicinity. I can immediately adjust to capture that image without changing my lens. This has even become more of an advantage as I have changed to the 5D Mark II with the full frame sensor. I really enjoy being able to use the 100 mm at its full focal length for the landscapes.

The lens is also fairly light to hand hold and the IS feature works very well. The images are sharp and only start to soften slightly as I use the maximum aperture f5.6 at 400 mm. You will find it is important to remember to turn off the IS when you mount it on a tripod and turn it back on again when you hand hold. I fail to do this once in a while and the image sharpness does suffer.

Below are some images that I have taken with this lens in the Palouse that shows its versatility.

Road to the Clouds by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved - ISO 200 f/13 1/320 200 mm

Road to the Clouds by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved - ISO 200 f/13 1/320 200 mm

Ring-necked Pheasant by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved - ISO 800  f/5.6  1/250  260 mm

Ring-necked Pheasant by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved - ISO 800 f/5.6 1/250 260 mm

Red Combine by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved - ISO 200  f/10  1/500  400 mm

Red Combine by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved - ISO 200 f/10 1/500 400 mm

Red Barn with Fence by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved - ISO 250  f/11  1/500  120 mm

Red Barn with Fence by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved - ISO 250 f/11 1/500 120 mm

Mule Deer in Flight by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved - ISO 1600  f/5.6  1/250  400 mm

Mule Deer in Flight by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved - ISO 1600 f/5.6 1/250 400 mm

I would highly recommend this lens to anyone wanting a good quality walk-around zoom lens. Thanks to its versatility and portability,  I think you will find it will become one of your favorite tools as well.

Image adjustments with Color Efex Pro 3.0

I have been using the Nik software Color Efex Pro 3.0 plug-in for Aperture for a couple of months. It has become an integral part of my workflow on many images. I will be showing a couple of adjustments to an image that I feel are valuable and very easily applied with this software.

I enjoy shooting large agricultural equipment in the working environment so that is what I will use for the demonstration of this program. My favorite equipment company for images is John Deere because the bright green and yellow colors always stand out so well against the landscape or sky. The first image below is the original image as it was captured.

Combine at Work 1 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Combine at Work 1 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

In the 2nd image I added a polarizing filter that is available in the Nik software. This filter has several adjustments available. They are set to the following defaults:

Rotate – 90%

Strength – 100% (60%) In parentheses it shows the opacity that I set for this image.

These adjustments with this filter give a little more pop to the image and also takes away some of the glare.

Combine at Work 2 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Combine at Work 2 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

In the 3rd image the tonal contrast filter was applied. The adjustments that are available are shown with their defaults and my adjustment in parentheses.

Highlight contrast – 30  (15)

Midtone contrast – 30 (15)

Shadows contrast – 30 (20)

Combine at Work 3 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Combine at Work 3 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

I feel this filter gives a little more definition to the image. Each of these adjustments was slight but each one helps to enhance the image as I had seen it. I hope these adjustments are clearly demonstrated event though the images are small.

This software program has many other filters which are easy to apply and the opacity can also be adjusted. Another important feature is that you can apply multiple filters as I demonstrated to the same image. I hope you have found this information to be useful and consider adding this useful program to your workflow.