Tag Archives: farming

In a Rut?

Deserted Barn - Copyright Gary Hamburgh 2009 - All Rights Reserved

I was sent an article a couple of days ago by a friend and I thought I would share it with you. It is entitled “Choose Your Rut Carefully” and it was written by Lori Woodward Simons. The article deals with how an artist gains a following and becomes known for a particular style or subject.

I have been enjoying photographing in the Palouse for the last few years and that subject has been something I have been known for. As I read the article it made me think about that subject matter and how it fits into my overall work of photography.

I think as you read the article, it will make you do some thinking about your style and how you want to be known. Being in a “rut” can be good or bad depending on your interest and goals.

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To be Simple

To be Simple is to be Great!

While on Christmas vacation, this sign caught my eye in a restaurant. It isn’t a great image but I liked the message. This is a meaningful message to me in life as well as in photography.

I have posted messages about simplicity before but the sign at the top of this post reminded me again of the importance of simplicity in your photos. The picture below is very simple but allows me to wonder what is the story behind this deserted homestead. I ask questions like “did anyone ever live here?’, “where did they go when they left,?”, or “do their descendants live in a newer house and farm the land in the background?”

Deserted Homestead - Copyright Gary Hamburgh 2009- All Rights Reserved

In a simple photo, the viewer gets the message of what you feel is important in the image. If they want to they can fill in the blanks or read between the lines. When you look for simplicity many times it is just as important to know what to leave out of the composition as it is to know what elements to include.

Remember, keeping the concept of simplicity in mind as you create your compositions may provide you with stronger message in your images.

Use Your Images to Brighten Your Day

Yellow and Green Fields - Copyright Gary Hamburgh 2009 - All Rights Reserved

During the winter when days are cold and bleak, I like to remember the beauty of the Palouse by looking at images from another season. The picture at the top of this post was taken last summer when the canola fields were in full bloom. The temperature was in the 90’s, I was dressed in shorts and enjoying the sunshine.

As I heard the news this morning, it was reported the temperature was 7 degrees with a possibility of snow in the Palouse. In Seattle where I live it is in the low 20’s. It definitely did me some good to look at the images from this summer to brighten my spirits and warm my inner soul.

Enjoy your images and see if it works for you.

Experience Creativity

GHamburgh_MG_2218-Farm-in-the-Palouse

Farm in the Palouse - Copyright Gary Hamburgh 2009 - All Rights Reserved

Creativity for most of us at times seems to be elusive. It seems we have the tendency in our work to go into a deep fog. It is difficult to drag ourselves out because we feel we have to do something totally awesome to get our creativity back.

My mentor Scott Bourne has posted an article on Photofocus that speaks to this issue of creativity. I find it very insightful as it offers some perspectives I hadn’t considered. Give it a read and see if the points hit home with you.

The final thought expresses being creative is “being you”.

Include something familiar to add perspective

High Atop a Bankout Wagon - Copyright Gary Hamburgh 2009 - All Rights Reserved

High Atop a Bankout Wagon - Copyright Gary Hamburgh 2009 - All Rights Reserved

Sometimes it is hard to get the perspective of how large an object, tree, rock or landmark is in a particular image. This is especially true as I like to emphasize the enormity of the equipment used during wheat harvest in the Palouse.

In the photo at the top of the page, I have used one of the workers as he was perched high on a bankout wagon to give perspective to the size of this equipment. These bankout wagons are used in areas where it is not convenient or possible to get a semi-truck and trailer into the field to empty the combine. The bankout wagon is pulled by a tractor to the bottom of the hill where it is unloaded into the semi-truck and trailer so the wheat can be hauled to a grain elevator.

Visit the Palouse and get ready to be amazed at the tremendous size of the equipment. Just the tires alone are almost as tall as a man. Remember using something or someone of a familiar size can add perspective to objects in your images.

In the photo at the top of the page, I have used one of the workers as he was perched high on a bankout wagon to give perspective to the size of this equipment. These bankout wagons are used in areas where it is not convenient or possible to get a semi-truck and trailer into the field to empty the combine. The bankout wagon is pulled by a tractor to the bottom of the hill where it us unloaded into the semi-truck and trailer so the wheat can be hauled to a grain elevator.
Visit the Palouse and get ready to be amazed at the tremendous size of the equipment. Just the tires alone are almost as tall as a man. Remember using something or someone of a familiar size can add perspective to objects in your imagesSometimes it is hard to get the perspective of how large an object, tree, rock or landmark is in a particular image. This is especially true as I like to emphasize the enormity of the equipment used during wheat harvest in the Palouse.
In the photo at the top of the page, I have used one of the workers as he was perched high on a bankout wagon to give perspective to the size of this equipment. These bankout wagons are used in areas where it is not convenient or possible to get a semi-truck and trailer into the field to empty the combine. The bankout wagon is pulled by a tractor to the bottom of the hill where it us unloaded into the semi-truck and trailer so the wheat can be hauled to a grain elevator.
Visit the Palouse and get ready to be amazed at the tremendous size of the equipment. Just the tires alone are almost as tall as a man. Remember using something or someone of a familiar size can add perspective to objects in your images.

Transporting the wheat to market

The last few weeks I have been photographing the wheat harvest and sharing aspects of that process.

Waiting to Load - Copyright Gary Hamburgh 2009 - All Rights Reserved

Waiting to Load - Copyright Gary Hamburgh 2009 - All Rights Reserved

Yesterday as I was leaving Colfax on my way to Walla Walla I decided to stop at Central Ferry and watch another part of getting the wheat to market.

It is a colorful process watching the tugboats and barges as they wait to be filled and then start on the long journey downriver to market. Central Ferry is located on the Snake River and it is interesting to watch the large trucks unload and then eventually the grain is transferred from the elevators to the waiting barges.

Getting Underway - Copyright Gary Hamburgh 2009-All Rights Reserved

Getting Underway - Copyright Gary Hamburgh 2009-All Rights Reserved

Take the opportunity to visit Central Ferry and you will get some great images as well as be able to see still another step in the wheat harvest.

Headed Downriver to Market - Copyright Gary Hamburgh 2009 - All Rights Reserved

Headed Downriver to Market - Copyright Gary Hamburgh 2009 - All Rights Reserved

Create images that share your experiences

Combines at Harvest - Copyright Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Combines at Harvest - Copyright Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

I have stated many times that “I hope to share the beauty that i see with others.” That is my goal as a photographer to share the actual experience that I am having with others.  I love to see vibrant exciting scenes that depict what is actually happening  at the time. I attempt to put myself in a position and frame of mind so I can feel like I am part of the environment and then capture that so others can enjoy that experience later.

I have shown the entire scene as I saw it in the photo at the top. In the second photo i was riding in the combine with the driver to show the details that he sees as he is cutting the wheat. I must admit that it is an awesome experience riding in the combine especially as the terrain steepens.

View from a Combine - Copyright Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

View from a Combine - Copyright Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

As you create and share your images with others consider the idea of helping to give them the same sense of time and place that you experienced. I believe this will help you to be more creative and give more impact to your images.