Tag Archives: wheat field

Include something familiar to add perspective

High Atop a Bankout Wagon - Copyright Gary Hamburgh 2009 - All Rights Reserved

High Atop a Bankout Wagon - Copyright Gary Hamburgh 2009 - All Rights Reserved

Sometimes it is hard to get the perspective of how large an object, tree, rock or landmark is in a particular image. This is especially true as I like to emphasize the enormity of the equipment used during wheat harvest in the Palouse.

In the photo at the top of the page, I have used one of the workers as he was perched high on a bankout wagon to give perspective to the size of this equipment. These bankout wagons are used in areas where it is not convenient or possible to get a semi-truck and trailer into the field to empty the combine. The bankout wagon is pulled by a tractor to the bottom of the hill where it is unloaded into the semi-truck and trailer so the wheat can be hauled to a grain elevator.

Visit the Palouse and get ready to be amazed at the tremendous size of the equipment. Just the tires alone are almost as tall as a man. Remember using something or someone of a familiar size can add perspective to objects in your images.

In the photo at the top of the page, I have used one of the workers as he was perched high on a bankout wagon to give perspective to the size of this equipment. These bankout wagons are used in areas where it is not convenient or possible to get a semi-truck and trailer into the field to empty the combine. The bankout wagon is pulled by a tractor to the bottom of the hill where it us unloaded into the semi-truck and trailer so the wheat can be hauled to a grain elevator.
Visit the Palouse and get ready to be amazed at the tremendous size of the equipment. Just the tires alone are almost as tall as a man. Remember using something or someone of a familiar size can add perspective to objects in your imagesSometimes it is hard to get the perspective of how large an object, tree, rock or landmark is in a particular image. This is especially true as I like to emphasize the enormity of the equipment used during wheat harvest in the Palouse.
In the photo at the top of the page, I have used one of the workers as he was perched high on a bankout wagon to give perspective to the size of this equipment. These bankout wagons are used in areas where it is not convenient or possible to get a semi-truck and trailer into the field to empty the combine. The bankout wagon is pulled by a tractor to the bottom of the hill where it us unloaded into the semi-truck and trailer so the wheat can be hauled to a grain elevator.
Visit the Palouse and get ready to be amazed at the tremendous size of the equipment. Just the tires alone are almost as tall as a man. Remember using something or someone of a familiar size can add perspective to objects in your images.
Advertisements

Create images that share your experiences

Combines at Harvest - Copyright Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Combines at Harvest - Copyright Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

I have stated many times that “I hope to share the beauty that i see with others.” That is my goal as a photographer to share the actual experience that I am having with others.  I love to see vibrant exciting scenes that depict what is actually happening  at the time. I attempt to put myself in a position and frame of mind so I can feel like I am part of the environment and then capture that so others can enjoy that experience later.

I have shown the entire scene as I saw it in the photo at the top. In the second photo i was riding in the combine with the driver to show the details that he sees as he is cutting the wheat. I must admit that it is an awesome experience riding in the combine especially as the terrain steepens.

View from a Combine - Copyright Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

View from a Combine - Copyright Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

As you create and share your images with others consider the idea of helping to give them the same sense of time and place that you experienced. I believe this will help you to be more creative and give more impact to your images.

Controlling artifacts in your images

Heading to Unload - Copyright Gary Hamburgh 2009 _ All Rights Reserved

Heading to Unload - Copyright Gary Hamburgh 2009 _ All Rights Reserved

I am sharing an article that discusses a very real problem that can exist in some of your images. The problem is artifacts which are blotchy or jagged areas that appear in the image when you zoom in.

This article was written by Nicole Young and was published by Scott Bourne on Photofocus.  The article explains artifacts and offers some advice for avoiding the problem.

I hope you find this article helpful and will utilize the information as you are creating wonderful images.

Combines at Work - Copyright Gary Hamburgh 2009 - All Rights Reserved

Combines at Work - Copyright Gary Hamburgh 2009 - All Rights Reserved

Make your Images into Products

 A Deere against the Sky - Copyright Gary Hamburgh 2009 - All Rights Reserved

A Deere against the Sky - Copyright Gary Hamburgh 2009 - All Rights Reserved

I am going to share this great post entitled “Want to go Pro? Productize Your Work” by my friend and mentor Scott Bourne. Be creative in putting your images into a product.

Visit the Palouse and share your great images with the world on a collection of products.

Choose your Combine by Color

John Deere Combine 1 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

John Deere Combine 1 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

When shooting harvest in the Palouse not only are you treated to some beautiful landscape, but the various colors of the farm equipment adds to your images.

John Deere Combine 2 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

John Deere Combine 2 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

John Deere combine 3 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

John Deere combine 3 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

In this post I am going to mainly just share images with you that were taken during the wheat harvest last week in the Palouse. The harvests showing the John Deere and Case combines were shot near Steptoe Butte. Each of the growers that was using these two brands was harvesting between 8500 and 10,000 acres. These are large operations and involve several combines and trucks at each location.

Case IH Combine 3 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Case IH Combine 3 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Case IH Combine by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Case IH Combine by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Case IH Combine 1 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Case IH Combine 1 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

The harvest showing the Gleaner equipment was shot near Dayton, WA. They were harvesting only 4500 acres and using two combines. In this process a tractor pulls a wagon up to the high country where the grain is emptied then the tractor pulls the wagon down to where it is loaded in a truck.

Gleaner Combine 2 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Gleaner Combine 2 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Gleaner Combine 1 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Gleaner Combine 1 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Gleaner Combine 3 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Gleaner Combine 3 by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

The dog in the last picture belongs to the man driving the combine. He runs with the combine all day, every day during the harvest.

Try to get to the Palouse to photograph the harvest. It is a colorful scene and very interesting to observe. Hopefully the images in this post let you experience some of the process and scenery that is involved during the wheat harvest.

Protecting Your Gear in Dusty Conditions

Combine Kicks up Dust by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Combine Kicks up Dust by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

I recently spent the last week shooting wheat harvest in the Palouse area near Colfax, WA. It was a great experience and the scenery was terrific. I quickly became very much aware that I needed to protect my camera gear from the dust that is kicked up by the combines.

The best way to protect your gear in these dusty conditions is with the rain covers you use when you shoot in the rain. They will also protect and keep dust off your gear. I have rarely been in conditions with the extreme dust and chaff that is surrounding you continually. Another word of caution, don’t get directly behind the combine as they are spewing out excessive amounts of dust and chaff whenever they are cutting. In addition to protecting your gear wear something to cover yourself as well because you will be extracting dirt and straw from your person for quite a while if you don’t.

Dust and Chaff in the Air by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Dust and Chaff in the Air by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

In the images that are displayed in this post hopefully you get the idea of the dust and debris that is present. Have a great time shooting the harvest but be prepared so you and your gear can have a more enjoyable time.

Clouds Can Be the Main Element

Clouds above the Landscape by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

Clouds above the Landscape by Gary Hamburgh - All Rights Reserved

I mentioned in a post a few weeks ago how clouds can be an important compositional element to balance an image. As I was in the Palouse last week, I saw this cloud formation that I decided to shoot as the main object of an image. This was taken just before sunrise as colors were beginning to show at first light.

In this image the clouds reminded me of a fountain spouting from the rolling hills. The uncluttered landscape and skies are one of my favorite aspects of the Palouse.

A trip to this region of eastern Washington can allow you to experience this beautiful simplicity.